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economy and do what's best for our people. >> tom: the president aims for a big budget deal, not a stopgap measure, before the end of the month. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 5. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. with the united states rapidly running out of borrowing room, the president is calling on republicans and democrats to move quickly. mr. obama has called leaders from both parties to the white house for a meeting thursday and susie, he's urging them to think big. >> susie: tom, with the calendar pressuring politicians to negotiate a plan allowing the u.s. to borrow more money, the president wants a deal cut in a few weeks and says it should not be a temporary one lasting only a few months. >> tom: the budget bargaining now heads to the white house with less than a month before time runs out. darren gersh reports. >> rep
says that mr. obama wants big government, not a big economy. >> republicans have tried to persuade the president of the need for a course correction. but weeks of negotiations have shown that his commitment to big government is simply too great to lead to the kind of long-term reforms we need. >> question. when the negotiations started, president obama was looking for a big deal. $4 trillion in spending cuts and tax hikes. has the big deal turned into a big fizzle, pat buchanan? >> it has not, john. did it for awhile but now it is back, and we're talking about something close to adds 4 trillion deal. the president is deep in negotiations with boehner and cantor, and here are the terms. you raise the debt ceiling, at the same time there are 3 trillion in cuts, and they deal with social security and medicare. there is no revenue enhancement. however, you get together some kind of commission which what it does, john, it drops tax rates in return for giving away these deductions, exemptions, allowances, breaks, which in effect is pure reaganism. there's one problem with that. there's a
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
the hacking happened. it is a big acts, but i do not think it solves the real issue and news international. >> i am satisfied that rebecca -- her leadership in the business and her standard of ethics, her standard of conduct throughout her career are very good. >> with big consumer company after big consumer company pulling their advertising from quoted news of the world," the commercial future -- from "news of the world," the commercial future was looking bleak. >> it is going to be investigated. there must be a full judicial inquiry. >> here is the other newspaper jewel acquired by rupert murdoch in 1969," the sun." could there be a sunday without a murdoch tabloid? unthinkable, surely. >> despite today's announcement, the fallout from the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policem
trillion over the next ten years or a big budget deal, $4 trillion with tax increases also over the next ten years. do these scenarios fill out a possibility or are they off the table. >> i think it's still going to ultimately be one of those three buckets. there's the first model which is basically politicians come together, can't hash out a deal and put in budget profits reform with targets where they'll come up with savings later or some kind of spending tax, promising to cut spending but they don't still in the policy. that's probably too close to what we've seen in the past or politicians say they'll do something but they'll get specific about how. the other two deals are more specific policy changes that will be included with the debt ceiling increase, either a smaller deal in the neighborhood how far 1 to $2 trillion dollars and stays away from the hard issues, no taxes, no social security or healthcare or the big deal we've been calling it to fix the deficit in this situation. that's what president obama and leader boehner have talked about. that's the group of senators the gage
, i think first of all the president realizes we have to get a big deal. as we discussed a couple of weeks ago or last week, charlie, if you don't send the appropriate signal to international financial communities, you can raise the debt ceiling but the interest costs are going to go through the roof. so it has to be a big deal and so i think he recognizes that. and i think speaker boehner subpoena looking at the reality of what's going to happen in 2013 without agreeing to what the president said. we're going to have 4.9% increases on taxes on everybody earning er $200,000 a year anyway just from the affordabl care act. so you'll see significant increase in taxes withoutany increased taxes put on the table. i think they can do a deal and i think a deal can get done if, in fact, we do take away a lot of the tax eendires and lower the rates so thatwe get an economic boom that would come a that. so i think it's still possible. i think things tend to happen in washington when they have to so my slope that something will come togher and occur. >> rose: how long do you think it will ta
of winning back the house, they don't want to go there. republicans have a big flank of new members elected on a pledge of no new taxes. nobody is dealing with reality. anybody on this panel, two of us could make a deal, but they cannot. >> why can they not make a deal, charles? >> you saw it in the clip you showed. nancy pelosi is the classic definition of a reaction. liberal. no changes in programs, entitlements. -- classic definition of a reactionary at liberal. no genocide programs, entitlements. if you all make -- note changes in programs, entitlements. if you don't make changes, he will wreck the economy, and everybody over the age of nine knows that. is that they are not willing to means test -- if they are not willing to means test entitlements, which you think and liberal alike, who always argue in terms of sharing the sacrifice and the rich bearing the burden, nothing will happen. >> colby? >> you just had exhibit number one of why they have not been able to reach a deal, as my friend charles expressed. if you start out with nancy pelosi and the position of republicans on tax incr
scale, he tried, he went for something big and failed. >> boehner is clearly on board for something. but i think right now the other four lders are trying to figure out is this politically where we want to go and can we assemble the votes for something of this magnitude. >> we conclude by turning to the n.b.a. and n.f.l. labor disputes with sally jenkins of the "washington post" and kevin blackistone of the university of maryland and espn. >> maybe it's time for fans to reassess why they're spending like crack addicts on the four major sports when there are lots of other affordable, available things to watch for a lot less money that appreciate the fans perhaps a little bit better and who value the fan more properly. >> with the n.f.l., it's very much reflective to me of what we're going through in america right now where in 201 you've had record profits in corporate america yet corporate america points to the economy, says it niece bad shape and pois to unions and workers and asks for concessions. that's the exact same thing going on in the n.f.l. when you talk about $9 billion in
off 7.5 points. volume was light, 762 million shares moving on the big board and 1.6 billion shares traded on the nasdaq. >> susie: investors may have a long list of worries, but it's hard to tell looking at the flurry of new stock offerings this week. they include dunkin brands, the parent of dunkin' donuts, which is also the week's largest deal. if all twelve companies on the calendar go public, it will be the best showing in almost five years. erika miller looks at what's behind this trend and what it means for investors. >> reporter: if there's one thing the stock market hates , it's uncertainty. so why would companies like dunkin donuts rush to go public this week of all weeks? there's lots of anxiety in financial markets about raising the nation's debt ceiling. and if a deal is not reached by next week, stocks could be headed for serious trouble. but i.p.o. expert richard peterson says dunkin and others are focused on the positives. >> the conditions are ripe for companies to raise capital in this environment, where the economy is growing, albeit at a slow rate. >> reporter: d
have overinterpreted the mandate from 2010. so we will have a big debate in 2012. there's no question about that. and an important debate. but i'm not sure that the voters will resolve it finally so that whoever is in power in 2013 can be able to go in the direction that they say they wt to. >> if you don't get the debt problem resolved, he knows it's going to nip at his heels at ever turn, no longer how long he's president of the united states. that's the underlying problem. even if you get to that point, there's a disagreement, i think, ideologically about what the government's role ought to be in that kind of economic policy. >>e continue this evening the documentary filmmaker and photographer with interesting ideas, not only about filmmaking, but also interviewing. >> i don't think that i discover that isn't there already. i would, again, describe it differently. i would say it's a desire, not to impose some idea of what a person is like on the movie that i'm making, but a process of discovery, of trying to uncover, in some way, something new, something interesting, something vita
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: once again today, debt-laden governments in europe grappled with massive public anger over austerity measures they'd imposed. in greece, the government won a bitter struggle today to rein in debt for bailout help. and in britain, civil servants took the streets. a tense calm returned to athens, greece today, but shards of glass lay strewn on the sidewalks and charred debris was stacked in the streets. they were the remnants of riots that raged into the night as protesters set fires and battled police, who fought back with clouds of tear gas. even so, the greek parliament voted today to implement the austerity measures it had endorsed yesterday. the international
opportunity to do something big. >> suarez: but after five straight days of talks with congressional leaders, president obama conceded today something big remains elusive. >> we are obviously running out of time. and so what i've said to the members of congress is that you need, over the next 24 to 36 hours, to give me some sense of what your plan is to get the debt ceiling raised through if they show me a serious plan, i'm ready to move, even if it requires some tough decisions on my part. >> suarez: the president had previously insisted on extending the debt ceiling through 2012 past next year's election. but after thursday's talks, he settled for asking congressional leaders to review three options with their members. the first-- the so-called "grand bargain" that mr. obama favors-- would cut deficits by about $4 trillion dollars, including spending cuts and new tax revenues. a medium-range plan would aim to reduce the deficit by about half that amount. the smallest option would cut between $1 trillion and $1.5 trillion dollars without increased tax revenue or any medicare and medicaid cu
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
a big jobs generator, the place they call the space coast. but in particular today i spent some time talking with travis thompson who has spent 33 years here at the kennedy space center working on the shuttle program. he is the lead technician on the clogout crew, the guys who button them up, the astronauts, strap them in, shut the door and send them off to space. he and his team, it was a very emotional day for them. as they were finishing up their job they had put together a series of cards with messages talking about their appreciation for the program, their patted rotism and frankly -- patriotism and their sadness, and the final word was god bless america, held by travis thompson himself. this is travis thompson's last day on the job, after 100 shuttle missions, getting the crews strapped in and ready to go to space, tomorrow he has no job. where he is going to go to work. as he said, my job is putting human beings in spacecraft to go to space. i don't see a lot of prospects for doing that somewhere else. so it is a poignant moment for him. >> so finally, miles, look back with us
be a big deal if the u.s. government couldn't pay its debts but i don't think that's where we're going to end up. we're not greece. greece is a small economy, greece is way, way deeper in hot than we are. people have lots of options where to put money and greece is low on their list because they think there's going to be a default. where the greece metaphor comes in is that greece and portugal and spain and ireland have raised questions about whether governments keep their promises. and to the extent that the congress and the president can agree on a long run fiscal plan, it raises the question of, are we ever going to get our act together so that we don't become greece? >> and is the market yet or do you suspect it will either price this in or panic? >> it's been amazing how calm the markets have been and i think there are two reasons for that. one is, they kind of assume that eventually washington will do what it has to do. and secondly, greece and europe have been such a preoccupation that nobody wants to have money there, so they've moved money to the u.s. as europe has done its ev
for the auto industry. we examine the new round of labor talks between the u.a.w. and detroit's big three. >> ifill: ray suarez gets an update on the turmoil in libya. >> brown: and we close with a paul solman story about a convicted murderer and middle school dropout who now makes $80,000 a year after completing college while behind bars. >> these are my dreams. i fit in right here, but this is what i'm looking at, this is where i want to be, this is where i can be, this is where i deserve to be. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scie
, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and
was the big question. it was cleveland himself who recommended going on a boat. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: senate democrats vowed to stay in session around the clock to resolve the debt crisis. house republicans modified their plan
, the sharpest >>> issue one, too big to fail? >> i urge democrats and republicans in the senate to find common ground on a plan they can get support that can get support from both parties in the houses, a plan that i can sign by tuesday. >> okay, the economic stats n the second quarter of this year, april, may, june, the u.s. economy grew at a rate of that's 4/10 every 1% growth. question, are these statistics a bigger worry than the debt ceiling prevailing argument? pat buchanan? >> they're equally big worries, john. despite the fact the president had an $800 billion stimulus fed is triple the money supply, three deficits of almost $5 trillion, the economy is dead in the water this. that argues for a stimulus of a reaganite stimulus or obama stimulus, but there's who more tools in the toolbox here. on the other side you have the debt deficit problem, which $10 trillion in deficits, which argues for austerity. spending cuts, taxations, so you've got two in total conflict. the president inherited aaron economy, john, that i think the only way this thing will go forward is through the old stagfl
planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: much talk, but little movement: the high-stakes debt and deficit impasse continued today, and last night's dueling primetime speeches by president obama and speaker boehner only seemed to reinforce the bitter stalemate over raising the country's borrowing limit. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: it was house speaker john boehner who had the last word
! why is he introducing it? >> i think the president is acting in good faith. i think he wants a big deal. i think he will take cuts that contracts won't want and take taxes. because his presidency and the future of the country -- he believes -- [everyone talking at once] >> socialistic. that what you're saying. >> vaguely socialistic, yes. >> when they came out with the report he said -- >> what is that report? >> that's a report that deals with the long-term deficit problems of this country. >> they recommend taxation, do they not. >> they had a whole series of recommendations, and the president said i will stand by what they did, except they're still waiting for him to stand by them. >> he's never taken it seriously, in not in his budget, not in his budget state, know when bowl simpson came city. not when they wanted a clean debt limit increase. so that he is winning a debate over the fiscal future of the country is astonishing! and. >> but he's keeping something else off page one! what is it? >> this is a genuine. >> the unemployment problem? it doesn't even figure in this. >> co
decimates the economy, then obama would be a big loser. >> rose: also this evening a conversation with paul krugman and david brooks th columnists at the "new york times". this conversation took pla before the president's press conference and therefore was edited accordingly. >> whave no consensus in our political system. there is no center. we have no consensus about what all to be happening. so if you try to strike a lo-term deal you're basically stking a deal that nobody actually beeves and that isot going to be adhered to. i think we buy we buy se time. shouldn't be negotiating at all about the debt ceiling but we buy someime and give the voters another chance to weigh in. >> we really need to cut i think some of the rating agencies have said this, we need to cut $4 trillion to sort of stabilize debt levels and if we don't do that that's really bad news. and then the second thing i do think both parties may find it useful to have a framework. no, we're to the going to write a plan that is going to dictate the next ten years of politics but both parties may find it extremely useful to ha
alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: twin bombings shattered the calm in a city north of baghdad today. more than three dozen iraqis were killed, with 50 or more wounded. it was the latest sign of rising violence as u.s. troops prepare to withdraw. the charred remains of a car bomb littered a street in the city of taji this afternoon. it blew up in the parking lot of a local government building, damaging nearby businesses and killing dozens of people. as ambulanc
. and this going on in washington is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at how different washington d.c. operated than every other business in america. where most american businesses make the hard choices to pay their bills, live within their means. in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. well, i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested businesses as usual. he had ner routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. here was a president asking for the largest debt increase in american history on the heels of the largest spending binge in american history. and here's what we got for that massive spending binge. a new health-care bill that most americans never asked for. a stimulus bill that's more effective in producing material for late night comedians than it was in producing jobs. and a national debt that has gotten so out of hand it sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united st
say privately they are -- there is still a big problem with corruption. nato's deployment has peaked. the question now is will the afghans be able to do the job of the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> that is the question indeed. on the ground, the fighting continues. in washington, three american senators, three -- two democrats and one republican pended op-ed in the "new york times" which called for a more rapid withdrawal of all american combat troops. tom udall is among those arguing the case. thank you for joining me. you criticize president obama for not bringing back american troops fast enough from afghanistan. what would you like him to do? >> the thing we have to realize is the thing we went in with objectives. those objectives were displacing a government that was harboring terrorists. terrorist camps, al qaeda was hooked up with them, and osama bin laden was in the region. now we have an elected government, we have completely changed the landscape, we have trained approximately 400,000 afghans in terms of army and police. al qaeda is decreased t
of favoring big corporate status quo and wall street even though in his heart of hearts, that is not what he believes. tavis: that may be a enough of an albatross to make sure that he does not get reelected. the first two well, he did not control. was all about law enforcement. the second was about congress, not necessarily the white house. it is the third one that could mess him up. he gets on the campaign trail, he can s u responsibility for the first two, can he not? >> the law enforcement part of that has been under his watch. it has and a lax effort. they have not been aggressive. but that's what the obama mentality of let's turn the page on tour -- if fits with the obama mentality of let's turn the page on torture. the dodd-frank, that is a shared responsibility. i wish the obama administration has taken more of a leading role when they were fighting on health care and pushing that forward. health care was taken by his opponents and used to demonize them and helped give him the congress that he now has. tavis: i am curious as to your take on this. how have the obama people so badly mis
the administration has done. paul krugman and others have suggested that it was never big enough from the start. the white house cut a deal and they thought they could get through even when they controlled both houses of congress. >> right. a couple of things. let's remember that it barely got through. there was not a lot of margin. that is related to the second point. i am sympathetic as a peer of economists to the notion that it should have been there. -- i am sympathetic as a pure and economist. it did not look obvious that say a trillion dollar stimulus could have gotten through the congress even though both congress is had democratic majority. -- both houses had a democratic majority. the number kept changing. it was 787 and now it is estimated to be 850 as more data came in. this is not at all obvious that we had gotten bigger. what is obvious is that we could have made it better. this is lost to history now, but you might remember in return for almost no republican votes, no matter what it was, the president gave over about 250 billion, about 1/3 of the stimulus. this was in the spirit o
. >> afghanistan off page one. iraq is on page one? >> in the ends of july, this is going to be up this big on page one finish they're in the deal. he's got to -- [everyone talking at once] >> unemployment rate on page one! >> if the unemployment rate comes out high, it will be the lead story in the newspaper, john. >> it will dominate the story that we just had? >> it will dominate if for a couple days. >> there will be a deal. >> there will be a deal? >> and there will be a deal and neither side will be happy. each side will give the other side something. they're -- >> not the taxes. that won't be part of the deal. taxes will not be part of the deal. >> what do you 90. >> tax revenues -- [everyone talking at once] >> they'll find something, i think, to agree on finally. i don't know whether it will be on august 2 or august 5th. but unemployment rate is not off the front pages. unemployment is -- on the number-one issue in 20% of american names. you have the biggest unemployment we've had since the great despres in real terms that. is what will kill obama's prospects if he doesn't do something abo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)